1. Education
Send to a Friend via Email

French Pronouns

There are many different kinds of French pronouns; master them with these detailed lessons.

French Pronouns
Introduction to the different types of personal and impersonal pronouns, plus an alphabetical list to help you find lessons on any French pronoun.

Adverbial Pronouns (Y, En)
The adverbial pronouns y and en are so tiny that one might think their role in a sentence is not very important, but in fact quite the opposite is true. They are both extremely important in French.

Demonstrative Pronouns (Celui, Celle, Ceux, Celles)
Demonstrative pronouns (this one, that one, the one[s], these, those) refer to a previously-mentioned noun in a sentence. They must agree with the gender and number of the noun(s) they replace

Direct Object Pronouns (Me, Te, Le...)
Direct object pronouns replace the direct object.

Disjunctive / Stressed Pronouns (Moi, Toi, Lui...)
Stressed pronouns, also known as disjunctive pronouns, are used to emphasize a noun or pronoun that refers to a person.

Indefinite Demonstrative Pronouns (Ce, Ceci, Cela, Ça)
Invariable demonstrative pronouns (ce, ceci, cela, ça) do not have a specific antecedent and thus do not have different forms for gender and number. Indefinite demonstrative pronouns can refer to something abstract, like an idea or a situation, or to something indicated but unnamed.

Indefinite Pronouns (Autre, Certain, Plusieurs...)
French indefinite pronouns, sometimes called affirmative indefinite pronouns, are unspecific and are used in place of nouns. Learn all about French indefinite pronouns like autre, d'autres, certain, chacun, and tout.

Indefinite Relative Pronouns (Ce que, Ce qui, Ce dont, Quoi)
Indefinite relative pronouns link relative clauses to main clauses but have no antecedent. Ce que, ce qui, ce dont, and quoi are the French indefinite relative pronouns, and there's no one-to-one equivalent for these words - depending on context, the English translation may be what or which.

Indirect Object Pronouns (Me, Te, Lui...)
Indirect objects are the people in a sentence to or for whom the action of the verb occurs. Indirect object pronouns are the words that replace the indirect object, and in French they can only refer to a person.

Indirect Object Pronouns and Verbs
In French, à plus a person can usually be replaced by an indirect object pronoun that gets placed in front of the verb (e.g., Il me parle). However, a few French verbs and expressions do not allow a preceding indirect object pronoun - instead, they require that you keep the preposition after the verb, and follow it with a stressed pronoun.

Informal Pronoun Pronunciation and Grammar
Learn about how pronouns are pronounced and used informally.

Interrogative Pronouns (Qui vs Que)
Learn how to use qui and que to ask questions.

Negative Pronouns (Aucun, Personne, Rien...)
French negative pronouns, sometimes called indefinite negative pronouns, are made up of two parts which surround the verb. Negative pronouns (ne aucun, ne nul, ne pas un) negate, refuse, or cast doubt on a quality of the noun they modify.

Neuter Object Pronoun (Le)
The French pronoun le can be a neuter object pronoun in certain constructions. The neuter object pronoun is optional; its usage is formal and is most common in written French.

Object Pronouns (Me, Te, Le, Lui...)
Object pronouns are those tricky little words in sentences that replace nouns affected by verbs. There are two types: direct objects and indirect objects, and they are some of the most common French words.

Object Pronouns - position and order
Lesson and quiz on using two object pronouns together.

Possessive Pronouns (Mien, Tiens, Siennes...)
Lesson and quiz on mine, yours, his, etc.

Reflexive Pronouns (Me, Te, Se, Nous, Vous)
Reflexive pronouns are a special kind of French pronoun which are used only with pronominal verbs. These verbs need a reflexive pronoun in addition to a subject pronoun because the subject(s) performing the action of the verb are the same as the object(s) being acted upon.

Relative Pronouns (Qui, que, lequel, dont, où)
Like its English counterpart, a French relative pronoun links a dependent/relative clause to a main clause. Que, qui, lequel, dont, and où are the French relative pronouns, and there's no one-to-one equivalent for these words - depending on context, the English translation may be who, whom, that, which, whose, where, or when.

Subject Pronouns (Je, Tu, Il...)
Learn about French subject pronouns.

French Adjectives and Pronouns
French has six types of adjectives with corresponding pronouns, meaning that the adjective plus noun can be replaced by an equivalent pronoun.

French Pronoun Finder
Want to learn more about a particular pronoun but don't know what type it is? The French Pronoun Finder is an alphabetical list of all the different French pronouns and includes links to the relevant lessons.

Le - Neuter Object Pronoun
The French pronoun le can be a neuter object pronoun in certain constructions. The neuter object pronoun is optional; its usage is formal and is most common in written French.

Lequel
Lequel, which usually means "which," is arguably the most difficult French pronoun, for several reasons.

Même
The French word même can be an indefinite adjective, indefinite pronoun, or adverb, and is also used in a number of expressions, making it an extremely versatile and useful French word.

On - Indefinite Subject Pronoun
On is the indefinite French subject pronoun, used mainly in colloquial French. Learn to use it here and discover the grammatical debate surrounding it.

On vs L'On
On is the French impersonal subject pronoun, and normally shouldn't be preceded by l' - neither the direct object nor the definite article. However, if you've been studying French for a while, particularly written French, you've probably seen l'on where you expected to find on and wondered what that l' was doing there. Here's everything you need to know.

Quiconque
Quiconque is a formal French word, found mainly in formal registers such as law and other administrative jargons. It can be an indefinite relative pronoun or an indefinite pronoun.

Se
Se is one of the most often misused French pronouns. It can only be used in two kinds of constructions, so check out this lesson to get "unconfused." :-)

Soi
Soi is another oft-confused French pronoun. It is used only for unspecified persons. Need more info? See the lesson!

Tel
The French word tel can be a qualifying adjective, an indefinite adjective, or an indefinite pronoun, and is also used in a number of expressions and conjunctions, making it an extremely versatile and useful French word.

Tout
Learn all about the French pronoun tout.

Tu vs Vous
It is essential to understand the difference between the two words for "you."

Un vs L'un
What's the difference between un and l'un? Isn't the second one kind of redundant? Learn about when and why to use l'un in place of un in this lesson.

Discuss in my forum

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.