1. Education
Send to a Friend via Email

Discuss in my forum

Laura K. Lawless


Iris en Provence

By May 22, 2009

Follow me on:

Nous avons visité la pépinière Iris en Provence pendant la période « portes ouvertes », dont il y a deux chaque année : avril/mai pour les iris, et juin pour les hémérocalles. À la périphérie d'Hyères, Iris en Provence est une maison de vente par correspondance qui offre plus de 200 variétés d'iris et 100 d'hémérocalles.

Les propriétaires, la famille Anfosso, sont collectionneurs et hybrideurs d'iris qui ont créé la société en 1975. Les Anfosso ont adhéré d'abord à la Société Française des Iris et Bulbeuses et puis, ayant trouvé qu'il n'y avait pas beaucoup d'hybrides en France à cette époque, à l'American Iris Society. Depuis le début des années 70, et grâce aux avis des plus grands hybrideurs américains, les Anfosso ont créé plus de 100 variétés d'iris. La tradition continue avec la deuxième et, prochainement, la troisième génération de la famille.

Iris en Provence
 Iris en Provence © LKL

English translation

Iris en Provence

We visited the Iris en Provence nursery during the "open house" period, one of two that are held each year: April/May, for irises, and June for hemerocallis. On the outskirts of Hyères, Iris en Provence is a mail order company which offers more than 200 varieties of irises and 100 of hemerocallis.

The owners, the Anfosso family, are iris collectors and hybridists who created the company in 1975. The Anfossos first joined the Société Française des Iris et Bulbeuses and then, having found that there weren't many hybrids in France at the time, the American Iris Society. Since the early 70s, and thanks to the advice of the biggest American hybridists, the Anfossos have created more than 100 iris varieties. The tradition continues with the family's second and, soon, third generation.

Comments

Please scroll down for the side-by-side translation.

* * *

The free About French Language Newsletter is sent twice a week to keep you informed about changes and additions to the Learn French at About site, including new lessons, articles, and forum discussions: Subscribe | Unsubscribe | Change Address

You can also subscribe to this French blog (RSS feed) and/or follow me on Twitter.

* * *

Side-by-side translation

Iris en Provence

Nous avons visité la pépinière Iris en Provence pendant la période « portes ouvertes », dont il y a deux chaque année : avril/mai pour les iris, et juin pour les hémérocalles. À la périphérie d'Hyères, Iris en Provence est une maison de vente par correspondance qui offre plus de 200 variétés d'iris et 100 d'hémérocalles.

Les propriétaires, la famille Anfosso, sont collectionneurs et hybrideurs d'iris qui ont créé la société en 1975. Les Anfosso ont adhéré d'abord à la Société Française des Iris et Bulbeuses et puis, ayant trouvé qu'il n'y avait pas beaucoup d'hybrides en France à cette époque, à l'American Iris Society. Depuis le début des années 70, et grâce aux avis des plus grands hybrideurs américains, les Anfosso ont créé plus de 100 variétés d'iris. La tradition continue avec la deuxième et, prochainement, la troisième génération de la famille.

Iris en Provence

We visited the Iris en Provence nursery during the "open house" period, one of two that are held each year: April/May, for irises, and June for hemerocallis. On the outskirts of Hyères, Iris en Provence is a mail order company which offers more than 200 varieties of irises and 100 of hemerocallis.

The owners, the Anfosso family, are iris collectors and hybridists who created the company in 1975. The Anfossos first joined the Société Française des Iris et Bulbeuses and then, having found that there weren't many hybrids in France at the time, the American Iris Society. Since the early 70s, and thanks to the advice of the biggest American hybridists, the Anfossos have created more than 100 iris varieties. The tradition continues with the family's second and, soon, third generation.

Comments

May 22, 2009 at 10:36 am
(1) Pamela Hanson says:

Love these flower and plant reports.

Hemerocallis – is that daylilies?

May 22, 2009 at 11:20 am
(2) George says:

Hemerocallis are daylilies. That begs the question: is there a more common term in French for “les hémérocalles”?

Laura, I love the focus on flowers. Thanks.

May 22, 2009 at 12:23 pm
(3) Gene Cosloy says:

I love reading your reports. As a self taught student of the language I have a question. What is the level achieved by a reader who is comfortable reading your French writing?

May 22, 2009 at 2:08 pm
(4) Jacqueline says:

Bonjour Laura,

J’aime bien les fleurs aussi,il ne faut pas oublié les belles fleurs des arbres et des Arbrisseaux, les Pivoines Arborescente, les Lilas Varin, les capucines, les petite viollettes dans les bois.
Aussi, le blé sur la table de cuisine, d’avoir une porte de chance de bonheur.

Que le Bon-Dieu vous Bénisse ainsi que votre foyer,
Jacqueline

May 22, 2009 at 10:51 pm
(5) hal_v_1937 says:

some additional information from “Gardening Australia” on the day lillies.
“Commonly known as daylilies because each flower lasts for just a single day, this small genus of 15 species of rhizome-rooted perennials from temperate East Asia is the type genus for its own family, the Hemerocallidaceae. The genus name, derived from Greek, also reflects the fleeting nature of the blooms, as it means day-beauty. Though the individual flowers are short-lived, they are produced in succession from late spring through to autumn, guaranteeing a blaze of color in the garden. There are many thousands of modern hybrid cultivars. All parts of the plant are edible and the buds and flowers make an interesting and colorful addition to salads, or can be used as a garnish. The stamens can be used as a saffron color substitute.”

May 23, 2009 at 1:20 am
(6) Laura K Lawless says:

George – no, I don’t think so. I check Le Grand Robert and it doesn’t offer any altnerative, and my bilingual dico finds no results for day lily.

Gene – interesting question. Maybe upper-intermediate / lower-advanced? It’s hard to say.

Laura K. Lawless
Learn French at About

May 26, 2009 at 1:56 am
(7) Barbara says:

Bonjour Laura
Je me demande pourquoi Jacqueline dit – il ne faut pas oublie – au lieu de -n’oubliez pas -Est-ce que tout les deux disent le meme chose?

Merci pour votre aide

May 26, 2009 at 6:58 am
(8) Laura K Lawless says:

Barbara -

Il ne faut pas oublier – You mustn’t / can’t / shouldn’t forget.

N’oubliez pas – Don’t forget.

Comme en anglais, les deux constructions sont plus ou moins interchangeables.

Laura K. Lawless
Learn French at About

Leave a Comment


Line and paragraph breaks are automatic. Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title="">, <b>, <i>, <strike>

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.