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Laura K. Lawless


Port-Grimaud, France

By April 3, 2009

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Jolie rue à Port-Grimaud
 Une jolie rue © LKL
En flânant dans ses petites rues et en regardant ses maisons de pêcheurs, on serait excusable de penser que Port-Grimaud est un ancien village typique, mais en réalité, il est loin d'être traditionnellement provençal. Plein de couleur et mignon comme tout, Port-Grimaud est une cité lacustre conçue par l'architecte François Spœrry dans les années 60. Cette « Venise provençale » comprend 7 kilomètres de canaux et 12 de quais et accueille quelque 500 000 visiteurs par an.

Vue sur Port-Grimaud
 Vue sur Port-Grimaud © LKL
Le piéton est roi à Port-Grimaud. La circulation et le stationnement de voiture sont très limités - on laisse normalement sa voiture dans le grand parking juste en face de l'entrée des visiteurs. On peut visiter cette jolie ville à pied, avec la possibilité de monter à la terrasse en haut de la Tour de l'Église pour la meilleure vue de la ville (coût : un euro). Mais le meilleur moyen de connaître ce port de plaisance est sur l'eau. Si vous ne comptez pas arriver sur votre propre voilier, il y a des tours en bateau, ou bien vous pouvez louer une barque électrique pour explorer en toute tranquillité.

English translation

Port Grimaud, France

While strolling along its little streets and looking at its fisherman's cottages, one could be forgiven for thinking that Port Grimaud is a typical old village, but in reality, it's far from being traditionally Provençal. Colorful and cute as can be, Port Grimaud is a lakeside village designed by the architect François Spoerry in the 60s. This "Provençal Venice" has 7 kilometers (about 4.3 miles) of canals and 12 (7.5) of docks and welcomes some 500,000 visitors a year.

The pedestrian is king in Port Grimaud. Driving and parking are very limited - you should leave your car in the big parking lot across from the visitor's entrance. You can visit this pretty town on foot, with the option to climb to the terrace at the top of the church tower for the best view of the town (cost: one euro). But the best way to get to know this sailing resort is on the water. If you're not planning to arrive on your own sailboat, there are boat tours, or else you can rent an electric boat to explore on your own.

Comments

Please scroll down for the side-by-side translation.

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Side-by-side translation

Port-Grimaud, France

Jolie rue à Port-Grimaud
 Une jolie rue © LKL
En flânant dans ses petites rues et en regardant ses maisons de pêcheurs, on serait excusable de penser que Port-Grimaud est un ancien village typique, mais en réalité, il est loin d'être traditionnellement provençal. Plein de couleur et mignon comme tout, Port-Grimaud est une cité lacustre conçue par l'architecte François Spœrry dans les années 60. Cette « Venise provençale » comprend 7 kilomètres de canaux et 12 de quais et accueille quelque 500 000 visiteurs par an.
Port Grimaud, France

While strolling along its little streets and looking at its fisherman's cottages, one could be forgiven for thinking that Port Grimaud is a typical old village, but in reality, it's far from being traditionally Provençal. Colorful and cute as can be, Port Grimaud is a lakeside village designed by the architect François Spoerry in the 60s. This "Provençal Venice" has 7 kilometers (about 4.3 miles) of canals and 12 (7.5) of docks and welcomes some 500,000 visitors a year.

Vue sur Port-Grimaud
 Vue sur Port-Grimaud © LKL
Le piéton est roi à Port-Grimaud. La circulation et le stationnement de voiture sont très limités - on laisse normalement sa voiture dans le grand parking juste en face de l'entrée des visiteurs. On peut visiter cette jolie ville à pied, avec la possibilité de monter à la terrasse en haut de la Tour de l'Église pour la meilleure vue de la ville (coût : un euro). Mais le meilleur moyen de connaître ce port de plaisance est sur l'eau. Si vous ne comptez pas arriver sur votre propre voilier, il y a des tours en bateau, ou bien vous pouvez louer une barque électrique pour explorer en toute tranquillité.

The pedestrian is king in Port Grimaud. Driving and parking are very limited - you should leave your car in the big parking lot across from the visitor's entrance. You can visit this pretty town on foot, with the option to climb to the terrace at the top of the church tower for the best view of the town (cost: one euro). But the best way to get to know this sailing resort is on the water. If you're not planning to arrive on your own sailboat, there are boat tours, or else you can rent an electric boat to explore on your own.

Comments

April 3, 2009 at 8:43 am
(1) Patricia says:

tres jolie cette ville, mercie de partage :)

April 3, 2009 at 1:53 pm
(2) Mick says:

Laura,
I am going from (2006) memory so forgive me if my details are less than accurate. Port Grimaud is right next door to St. Madeline which I liked better than St. Tropez because it is less touristy and just as pretty. Albeit St. Tropez gets a lot more million dollar yachts coming in to its harbor which a lot of people like to watch as they tie up to the docks. Did you get a chance to explore St. Madeline just across the bay from St. Tropez?

Since you went to Port Grimaud, you probably passed by the largest multipurpose store in the area called GEANT. I would equate it to our COSTCO here in the states. GEANT is located roughly where you would turn off going to St. Tropez from the main coastal highway or keep strraight to Port Grimaud. What I liked about GEANT is that walking back to the seafood and meat section, you are bombarded with a collision of wonderful scents and smells of fresh seafood together with fresh herbs and spices in the adjacent section. You just had the sensation that you wanted to taste everything in sight.

And finally, again if you drove along the coastal highway from Hyeres, you passed thru a little town called La Croix Valmer. Several months ago I had written to you to stop in at the Le Resto restaurant right on the northwest corner (only stoplight). Once a month the owner prepares a virtual feast called “Fete du Galloise” where he provides several courses of food from that region. I got indigestion trying to eat it all.

Anyway I envy your stay in the region. But your chronicles of the little villages in that area bring back fond memories my month long stay in Cavalaire-sur-mer, about 20 miles west of St. Tropez.

Merci beaucoup, madame.

April 3, 2009 at 2:18 pm
(3) Brian says:

A really beautiful resort to visit.I was there in 1982 on an excursion whilst on a
camping holiday up in the mountains,miles from anywhere and boy,was I glad to have the opportunity of a day out from that campsite .
I still have the sweater I bought in Port Grimaud that day A black one with the name of the resort written in white across the front
Thank you for bringing back to me some really
wonderful memories of France.

April 3, 2009 at 4:56 pm
(4) Craig Carragan says:

We will be going to the South of France in October and would like to spend a night ot three in the Port-Grimaud area. Can someone suggest a good place to stay. We prefer beautiful B&Bs or country inns. Thanks
Craig

April 3, 2009 at 6:33 pm
(5) Liz says:

Question: Is it possible that you could write out the numbers instead of just putting the number? I have the hardest time remembering how to say them, and I think that would help.

April 4, 2009 at 5:48 am
(6) Marin says:

Oh Liz you are incredible.

les années 60 is pronounced sua-sun-t
7 kilométres is pronounced set
12 de quais is pronounced dooze
while 500 000 visiteurs is pronounced sunk-saun-mil

appréciez!

April 4, 2009 at 5:50 am
(7) Laura K Lawless says:

Liz – I have pages and pages of number exercises : http://french.about.com/library/begin/bl-numbers.htm

Laura K. Lawless
Learn French at About

April 4, 2009 at 9:32 pm
(8) Jo Beau says:

I just have a quick question and forgive me for being so bold but shouldn’t “on serait excusable” be “il serait excusable”?
It’s always a pleasure to read your blog.
Jo

April 5, 2009 at 2:00 am
(9) Laura K Lawless says:

Jo -

Il serait excusable = It would be excusable

On serait excusable = One would/could be excused

Laura K. Lawless
Learn French at About

April 5, 2009 at 10:32 am
(10) joanpeace says:

We are leaving tonight to spend two weeks in France. I have used your website extensively in the past few months and cannot begin to tell you how much it has helped me! I read your blogs regularly and have watched my comprehension grow steadily. Your grammar exercises and tests are superb! I can’t believe this is all for free. Our next trip will be to Germany in 2010. I hope the about.com people will be able to find an equally phenomenal guide for their German site. (you don’t by chance have a German-speaking clone, do you?)
Merci mille fois, Laura!

April 5, 2009 at 11:25 am
(11) suzette says:

I have a great suggestion for a hotel in Port Grimaud. We stayed here last year for two weeks. It is a small hotel with maybe 20 rooms and 6 apartments, perfect location, great friendly staff:
Hotel Le Suffren
http://www.rivieraby.com/lesuffren/

We also enjoyed the town of Grimaud, about 5 ins away.

April 5, 2009 at 4:08 pm
(12) Michel says:

Je vous remercie de m’avoir aide avec mon comprehension.

April 5, 2009 at 4:16 pm
(13) michel says:

j’ ai pensée que ”colouful” est ”coloré” en francaise. Mais vous avez ecrit ”Plein de couleur”.

April 6, 2009 at 4:38 am
(14) Laura K Lawless says:

Michel – coloré veut dire “colored” tout simplement.

Laura K. Lawless
Learn French at About

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